Tag Archives: race relations

On This Day – “High Court Rules Bus Segregation Unconstitutional”

On Nov. 13, 1956, the Supreme Court struck down laws calling for racial segregation on public buses.

“The Court affirmed a ruling by a three-judge Federal court that held the challenged statutes ‘violate the due process and equal protection clauses of the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States.’

The Fourteenth Amendment provides that no state shall deprive any person of life, liberty, or property without due process of law nor deny to any citizen the equal protection of the laws.

[Officials of several Southern states indicated they would continue to enforce bus segregation laws despite the court’s decision. Segregationist leaders were bitter in their denunciations of the court and its ruling.]”

20121113-094547.jpg(Source)

On This Day – “Birmingham Bomb Kills 4 Negro Girls”

On Sept. 15, 1963, four black girls were killed when a bomb went off during Sunday services at a Baptist church in Birmingham, Alabama, in the deadliest act of the civil rights era.

Parents of 3 of the Girls Are Teachers

Both parents of each of three of the victims teach in the city’s schools. The dead were identified by University Hospital officials as:

Cynthia Wesley, 14, the only child of Claude A. Wesley, principal of the Lewis Elementary School, and Mrs. Wesley, a teacher there.

Denise McNair, 11, also an only child, whose parents are teachers.

Carol Robertson, 14, whose parents are teachers and whose grandmother, Mrs. Sallie Anderson, is one of the Negro members of a biracial committee established by Mayor Boutwell to deal with racial problems.

Addie Mae Collins, 14, about whom no information was immediately available.

20120915-121606.jpg

You can read the article in it’s entirety, as it was reported in 1963 by clicking on the following link: (Source)

On This Day – “New Negro Riots Erupt on Coast”

On Aug. 11, 1965, deadly rioting and looting broke out in the predominantly black Watts section of Los Angeles. Officials called it the worst racial incident in the city’s history.

The corner of Imperial and Avalon in the Watts section, the center of the rioting, is a typical Los Angeles intersection: with gas stations, Taco stands and small shops.

It was shortly before 8 o’clock when a white Californian Highway Patrol officer stopped a Negro motorist on suspicion of drunken driving.

The suspect, Marquette Frye, 21 years old, was with his brother Ronald.

Some 25 persons were watching the incident when their mother, Mrs. Rena Frye, arrived on the scene and began berating her son, who in turn berated the police.

The crowd grew, new police units arrived and the rock-throwing began. By 10 P.M. crowds were stoning passing city buses. Over 80 police officers rushed to the scene and sealed off a 16-block area in an effort to contain the violence.

The rioting took place only a little over a mile from the Watts towers, three 100-foot high-stacks of bottles and metal scrap created by the late Simon Rodia, an eccentrist Italian tile-setter.

The Watts neighborhood, despite the low income of most of its residents, nonetheless retains a pleasantly suburban aura.

The streets are generally clean and tree-lined. Some of the single-family homes are in decay but most are well kept with green, well-tended small lawns. Many two-story apartment buildings have been added and children play around their entrances.

Residents of the area offered conflicting interpretations of the rioting. “The cops, they keep coming in here and busting heads,” said a neatly dressed young man selling a Black Muslim newspaper. “They had it coming.”

Mrs. M. J. Ellis, who describes herself as a missionary, blamed restless teenagers. “Their parents can’t seem to do anything and the police can’t do anything either”, she said.

Officials were at a loss to explain the cause of the rioting. The unusually hot, smoggy weather was doubtless a contributing factor.

20120811-100347.jpg

(Source: New York Times)

On This Day in 1971…

On April 20, 1971, the United States Supreme Court upheld the use of busing to achieve racial desegregation in schools.

20120420-081817.jpg

(Source)