Category Archives: Black History

On This Day – “2 Black Power Advocates Ousted From Olympics”

On Oct. 18, 1968, the United States Olympic Committee suspended two black athletes, Tommie Smith and John Carlos, for giving a “black power” salute as a protest during a victory ceremony in Mexico City.

“The two Negro sprinters were told by Douglas F. Roby, the president of the committee, that they must leave the Olympic Village. Their credentials also were taken away, which made it mandatory for them to leave Mexico within 48 hours.”20121018-105613.jpg(Source)

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On This Day – Martin Luther King Wins Nobel Prize For Peace

On Oct. 14, 1964, civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. was named winner of the Nobel Peace Prize.

“The 35-year-old civil rights leader is the youngest winner of the prize that Dr. Alfred Nobel instituted since the first was awarded in 1901.

The prize honors acts ‘for the furtherance of brotherhood among men and to the abolishment or reduction of standing armies and for the extension of these purposes.’

Dr. King said that “every penny” of the prize money, which amounts to about $54,000, would be given to the civil rights movement.”

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On This Day – Thurgood Marshall Became First Negro To Sit On The High Court

On Oct. 2, 1967, Thurgood Marshall was sworn in as an associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, becoming the first black to serve on the high court.

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On This Day – “All Slaves in States in Rebellion on the First of January Next to be Free”

On Sept. 22, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln issued the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, declaring all slaves in rebel states should be free as of Jan. 1, 1863.

That on the first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, all person held as slaves within any State, or any designated part of a State, the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States shall be then, thenceforward, and forever, free;

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(Source)

On This Day – “Birmingham Bomb Kills 4 Negro Girls”

On Sept. 15, 1963, four black girls were killed when a bomb went off during Sunday services at a Baptist church in Birmingham, Alabama, in the deadliest act of the civil rights era.

Parents of 3 of the Girls Are Teachers

Both parents of each of three of the victims teach in the city’s schools. The dead were identified by University Hospital officials as:

Cynthia Wesley, 14, the only child of Claude A. Wesley, principal of the Lewis Elementary School, and Mrs. Wesley, a teacher there.

Denise McNair, 11, also an only child, whose parents are teachers.

Carol Robertson, 14, whose parents are teachers and whose grandmother, Mrs. Sallie Anderson, is one of the Negro members of a biracial committee established by Mayor Boutwell to deal with racial problems.

Addie Mae Collins, 14, about whom no information was immediately available.

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You can read the article in it’s entirety, as it was reported in 1963 by clicking on the following link: (Source)

On This Day – “New Negro Riots Erupt on Coast”

On Aug. 11, 1965, deadly rioting and looting broke out in the predominantly black Watts section of Los Angeles. Officials called it the worst racial incident in the city’s history.

The corner of Imperial and Avalon in the Watts section, the center of the rioting, is a typical Los Angeles intersection: with gas stations, Taco stands and small shops.

It was shortly before 8 o’clock when a white Californian Highway Patrol officer stopped a Negro motorist on suspicion of drunken driving.

The suspect, Marquette Frye, 21 years old, was with his brother Ronald.

Some 25 persons were watching the incident when their mother, Mrs. Rena Frye, arrived on the scene and began berating her son, who in turn berated the police.

The crowd grew, new police units arrived and the rock-throwing began. By 10 P.M. crowds were stoning passing city buses. Over 80 police officers rushed to the scene and sealed off a 16-block area in an effort to contain the violence.

The rioting took place only a little over a mile from the Watts towers, three 100-foot high-stacks of bottles and metal scrap created by the late Simon Rodia, an eccentrist Italian tile-setter.

The Watts neighborhood, despite the low income of most of its residents, nonetheless retains a pleasantly suburban aura.

The streets are generally clean and tree-lined. Some of the single-family homes are in decay but most are well kept with green, well-tended small lawns. Many two-story apartment buildings have been added and children play around their entrances.

Residents of the area offered conflicting interpretations of the rioting. “The cops, they keep coming in here and busting heads,” said a neatly dressed young man selling a Black Muslim newspaper. “They had it coming.”

Mrs. M. J. Ellis, who describes herself as a missionary, blamed restless teenagers. “Their parents can’t seem to do anything and the police can’t do anything either”, she said.

Officials were at a loss to explain the cause of the rioting. The unusually hot, smoggy weather was doubtless a contributing factor.

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(Source: New York Times)

On this Day: “Althea Gibson Becomes First Negro to Take Wimbledon Tennis”

On July 6, 1957: Wimbledon, England, Althea Gibson fulfilled her destiny at Wimbledon and became the first member of her race to rule the world of tennis. Reaching a high note at the start, the New York Negro routed Darlene Hard, the Montebello (Calif.) waitress, 6-3, 6-2, for the all-England crown.

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(Source)